Question: What Is A Better Word For Was?

What is another word for was?

What is another word for was?appearedbecamelookedseemedcame to behad beenhas beenhave beenturned out to bewere2 more rows.

What is the definition of was?

past tense first- and third-person singular of be.

What is the antonym for has been?

Opposite words for has-been: outdated/out-of-date. outmoded. passe. failure.

What is another word for bottom line?

In this page you can discover 31 synonyms, antonyms, idiomatic expressions, and related words for bottom line, like: final decision, the-bottom-line, main idea, last-word, crux, point, RightNow, net income, conclusion, FrontRange and upshot.

What is the opposite of innocent?

Antonyms for innocent blamable, immoral, unvirtuous, corrupt, sinful, bad, knowledgeable, evil, impure, experienced, cunning, stained, guilty.

What is a good word for best?

Best – thesaurusbest. adjective. used for referring to the person or thing that is the most satisfactory, suitable, pleasant, effective, of the highest quality etc.ideal. adjective. … first class. adjective. … first-rate. adjective. … incomparable. adjective. … unsurpassed. adjective. … premier. adjective. … par excellence. adjective.More items…

Is Betterer a word?

(nonstandard) Comparative form of better: more better.

What’s a fancy word for better?

What is another word for better?superiorfinerwonderfullerhigher-gradehigher-calibreimprovedgranderenhancedmore desirablemore valuable18 more rows

What to say instead of all in all?

Synonyms & Antonyms of all in allall around,all told,altogether,collectedly,collectively,inclusively,overall,together.

Is inclusively a word?

Inclusively is defined as something done in a way that includes everyone or everything.

Is was past tense?

Actually, was/were are the past tense form of the verb “to be”. … If you want to remember easily, you can think of was/were as the past tense form of the auxiliary verbs am, is and are. Generally, “was is used for singular objects and “were” is used for plural objects.

What is definition of past?

The past is the set of all events that occurred before a given point in time. The past is contrasted with and defined by the present and the future. … The first known use of the word “past” was in the fourteenth century; it developed as the past participle of the middle English verb passen meaning “to pass.”

What’s the opposite of past?

What is the opposite of past?beforetoprioraforeereofahead ofprevious toprior to

What is the saying all in all?

Overall; mostly. This phrase is typically used when one is considering all aspects of something together. Sure, it rained on our vacation, but all in all we had a great time.

What kind of verb is was?

linking verbsThe most common linking verb is the verb to be in all of its forms (am, are, is, was, were, etc.). This verb may also be used as a helping verb (see next section). To become and to seem are always linking verbs.

What is another word for past?

What is another word for past?doneoverextinctformerancientbygonecompletedgone byspentaccomplished20 more rows

What is another word for had been?

What is another word for had been?has beenwaswerebecamecame to behave beenwuswastwuz2 more rows

Had been meaning?

“Had been” is used to mean that something happened in the past and has already ended. “Have been” and “has been” are used to mean that something began in the past and has lasted into the present time.

Has been used?

Has been is used in the third-person singular and have been is used for first- and second-person singular and all plural uses. The present perfect tense refers to an action that began at some time in the past and is still in progress.

When to Say Was or were?

Was is used in the first person singular (I) and the third person singular (he, she, it). Were is used in the second person singular and plural (you, your, yours) and first and third person plural (we, they).

What is the adjective of improve?

The adjective improving comes from the verb improve, “make or become better.” The root of both words lies in the Anglo-French word emprower, “to turn to profit,” from the Latin prodest, “is of advantage.”